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Hearing Resources

The Better Hearing Institute (BHI) 
BHI is a not-for-profit corporation that educates the public about the neglected problem of hearing loss and what can be done about it. Founded in 1973, we are working to:

  •   Erase the stigma and end the embarrassment that prevents millions of people from seeking help for hearing loss.
  •   Show the negative consequences of untreated hearing loss for millions of Americans.
  •   Promote treatment and demonstrate that this is a national problem that can be solved.

Contact Information
Better Hearing Institute, 1444 I Street, NW
Suite 700
Washington, DC 20005
202-449-449-1100
www.betterhearing.org
mail@betterhearing.org 


Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA)
HLAA provides assistance and resources for people with hearing loss and their families to learn how to adjust to living with hearing loss. Its national support network includes an office in the Washington, DC, area as well as 14 state organizations and 200 local chapters.

Contact Information
Hearing Loss Association of America
7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 1200
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-657-2248 (Voice/TTY)
www.hearingloss.org


Association of Adult Musicians with Hearing Loss (AAMHL)
AAMHL's mission is to create opportunities for adult musicians with hearing loss to discuss the challenges they face in making and listening to music; create opportunities for public performance; provide ongoing feedback to hearing health professionals; and provide educational opportunities.

Contact Information
AAMHL, Inc.
P.O. Box 522
Rockville, MD 20848
301-838-0443
www.aamhl.org
info@aamhl.org


American Tinnitus Association (ATA)
The mission of the ATA is to silence tinnitus through education, advocacy, research, and support. This nonprofit organization provides the latest information and resources to tinnitus patients, promotes tinnitus awareness to the general public and the medical community, and funds the nation's brightest tinnitus researchers.

Contact Information
American Tinnitus Association
P.O. Box 5
Portland, OR 97207-0005
800-634-8978
www.ata.org
tinnitus@ata.org


Association of Late-Deafened Adults, Inc. (ALDA)
ALDA serves as a resource center providing information and referrals, self-help, and support groups for people deafened as adults. ALDA works to increase public awareness of the special needs of deafened adults.

Contact Information
Association of Late-Deafened Adults, Inc.
8038 MacIntosh Lane
Rockford, IL 61107
815-332-1515 (Voice/TTY)
866-402-2532 (Voice/TTY)
www.alda.org
info@alda.org


Association of Medical Professionals With Hearing Losses (AMPHL)
AMPHL aims to assist those in the professional health fields address issues surrounding their hearing loss. To help achieve this goal, their website provides information based on current issues in health fields along with personal experiences and insights into making hearing loss more compatible with the medical profession.

Contact Information
Association of Medical Professionals With Hearing Losses
www.amphl.org


American Cochlear Implant Alliance
The American Cochlear Implant (ACI) Alliance is a not-for-profit organization created with the purpose of eliminating barriers to cochlear implantation by sponsoring research, driving heightened awareness, and advocating for improved access to cochlear implants for patients of all ages across the United States.

Contact Information
ACI Alliance
P.O. Box 103
McLean, VA 22101-0103
703-534-6146 (Voice)
www.acialliance.org
info@acialliance.org


American Society for Deaf Children (ASDC)
ASDC is a national organization of families and professionals committed to educating, empowering, and supporting parents and families of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. The ASDC helps families find meaningful communication options, particularly through the competent use of sign language, in their home, school, and community.

Contact Information
American Society for Deaf Children
3820 Hartzdale Drive
Camp Hill, PA 17011
866-895-4206 (Voice)
717-334-7922 (Voice/TTY)
www.deafchildren.org
asdc@deafchildren.org


Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (AG Bell)
AG Bell is a membership-based information center on hearing loss, emphasizing the use of technology, speech, speechreading, residual hearing, and written and spoken language. AG Bell focuses specifically on children with hearing loss, providing ongoing support and advocacy for parents, professionals, and other interested parties.

Contact Information
Alexander Graham Bell Association
3417 Volta Place, NW
Washington, DC 20007
202-337-5220 (Voice)
202-337-5221 (TTY)
http://nc.agbell.org
info@agbell.org


National Association of the Deaf (NAD)
Established in 1880, the NAD is the nation's largest consumer organization safeguarding the accessibility and civil rights of 28 million deaf and hard of hearing Americans in education, employment, health care, and telecommunications. The NAD focuses on grassroots advocacy and empowerment, captioned media, deafness-related information and publications, legal assistance, policy development and research, public awareness, certification of interpreters, and youth leadership development.

Contact Information
National Association of the Deaf
8630 Fenton Street, Suite 820
Silver Spring, MD 20910
301-587-1788 (Voice)
301-587-1789 (TTY)
www.nad.org


National Black Deaf Advocates (NBDA)
NBDA is the oldest and largest consumer organization of deaf and hard of hearing black people in the United States. Black deaf leaders were concerned that deaf and hard of hearing African Americans were not adequately represented in leadership and policy-making activities affecting their lives, so they established NBDA in 1982.

Contact Information
National Black Deaf Advocates
P.O. Box 32
Frankfort, KY 40602
www.nbda.org




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Disclaimer:
Hearing aids do not restore “normal” hearing. Personal experiences vary depending on type and severity of hearing loss, accuracy of testing procedures, proper fitting and one’s ability to acclimate to amplification.
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